The 4-hour Workweek

  • Author: Tim Ferriss
  • by Amando Abreu

Expectations when reading the 4-hour workweek

I expected to find ways of making the same amounts of money by working fewer hours.

Mega TL;DR;

Build highly efficient revenue-generating systems that require almost no input from you by focusing on few things, automating what can be automated, and hiring people to make the decisions that need to be made by a human. Give the people you hire a lot of freedom to make mistakes and learn as they go. The mistakes will be worth it in the long run as they feel better because of the autonomy and won’t need to bother you nearly as much.

Tim Ferriss suggests doing this with your own job by:

  1. Working remotely
  2. Outsourcing what can be outsourced

Similar books:

- Built to sell(it’s like a 4-hour workweek that uses the boomer fantasy instead of the millennial one)

The 4-hour workweek notable quotes

“A person’s success in life can usually be measured by the number of uncomfortable conversations he or she is willing to have.”

“Focus on being productive instead of busy.”

“Never automate something that can be eliminated, and never delegate something that can be automated or streamlined. Otherwise, you waste someone else’s time instead of your own, which now wastes your hard-earned cash. How’s that for incentive to be effective and efficient?”

(on giving people autonomy)

“It’s amazing how someone’s IQ seems to double as soon as you give them responsibility and indicate that you trust them.”

Spoiler

Tim Ferriss probably works around 80 hours a week

About the author

Amando Abreu got into electronics as a kid, started programming microchips in his early teens, moved onto web development in his late teens, and got into people; psychology; and business in his twenties.

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